Mulefoot

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Mangalitsa

Heritage Breed

Listed on the Slow Food USA's Ark of Taste.


The Mangalitsa is a Hungarian breed of domestic pig.  Hungarian farmers developed the Mangalitsa lard pig during the 19th century. Mangalitsa lard, bacon and salami quickly became prized commodities throughout Europe. It remained Hungary’s most popular breed well into the 1950s. The Mangalitsa pig grows a thick, woolly coat similar to that of a sheep.  It is a robust, slow-growing hog with short legs, floppy ears and a short, upturned snout. Chefs at high-end restaurants sing the praises of the Mangalitsa’s dark, sweet, juicy pork.

Red Wattle

Mangalitsa

Guinea Hog

Livestock Conservancy Status: Threatened
Heritage Breed

Listed on the Slow Food USA's Ark of Taste.


The Guinea Hog is a compact, hairy, black or occasionally red pig with upright ears and a curly tail. It was a fixture on homesteads in the American Southeast for more than 200 years. A landrace breed selected over a long period of time for conditions in the South, its type and size vary greatly. Typical adults weigh 150 to 250 pounds and can have long or short snouts and erect or semi-lopped ears. As a lard breed, Guinea Hogs tend to pack on too much fat when raised in semi-confinement, but they’re hardy and peerless foragers, making them ideal heritage pastured-pork producers. Their pork is so delicious that it’s listed on Slow Food USA’s Ark of Taste, a catalog of more than 200 foods in danger of extinction.

Large Black:

Livestock Conservancy Status:Threatened

​Heritage Breed


The Large Black, also known as the Devon or Cornwall Black, is a breed of domestic pig native to Great Britain.  This is a large, long-bodied black pig with gray skin, a medium-long snout and huge lopped ears that cover its face. It is robust with a docile temperament.   They’re peerless foragers and famed as efficient converters of feed into exceptionally tasty, nicely marbled pork. Becoming popular in the early 1900s, the Large Black was exported to many parts of the world. Numbers declined after World War II as farmers turned to breeds which were more suitable for intensive pig farming, and by the 1960s the breed was almost extinct. The population is now on the increase again, but the breed is still considered vulnerable.  Large Black sows typically give birth to large litters.  Meat from the Large Black is known for its old world flavor producing exceptional bacon. It's red, micro-marbled, meat is extra tender due to the short muscle fibers which have earned it a place in some of the most exclusive restaurants.

Tamworth

Livestock Conservancy Status: Watch

Heritage Breed


The Tamworth hog descended from a type already well-established in the British Middle Ages, a time when there were yet to be established breeds. It’s named for the village of Tamworth in Staffordshire and came to Canada in 1877 and the U.S. in 1882. They’re medium to large, narrow-bodied red hogs with long legs and bodies, upright ears and a long, straight snout. They’re active, intelligent pigs that don’t take well to confinement but are excellent foragers and rooters that do exceptionally well outdoors. They yield firm-textured, nicely marbled, lean pork.

Hereford

Duroc

Hereford

Livestock Conservancy Status: Watch
Heritage Breed


Named for its color and pattern, which is similar to that of Hereford cattle, the Hereford Pig is red with a white face. Originating in America, the Hereford is a rare variety which was created in the 1920s from a synthesis of the Duroc, the Poland China, the Chester White and Berkshire pigs.  The breed is very popular in the Midwestern United States.  By the mid-20th century the population had grown considerably, but it decreased again from the 1960s as the commercial pork industry moved away from purebred hogs toward hybrids. Today 2,000 breeding animals remain.  Herefords thrive on pastures and are known for their calm disposition. Hereford pigs yield rich colored, marbled meat.

Ossabaw Island

Livestock Conservancy Status:Critical

​Heritage Breed

Listed on the Slow Food USA's Ark of Taste.


Ossabaw Island Hogs descend from swine that Spanish explorers left on Ossabaw Island almost 400 years ago. No additional genetics have been added over the years, so they’re as feral-looking as a recognized breed can be. Adults tip the scale between 100 to 250 pounds, and they carry an unusual “thrifty gene” that enables them to pack on weight when food is plentiful and live off stored fat when it isn’t. Ossabaw Island Hogs are hardy and adept foragers that are easy to bring to slaughter weight on a mainly pasture diet. Their red, spicy pork is a favorite of gourmet chefs, also earning them a place on the Ark of Taste.

Gloucestershire Old Spots 

Livestock Conservancy Status: Threatened
Heritage Breed


A large, predominately white pig with a few black spots, the Gloucestershire Old Spots has huge lopped ears that droop over its face and a long, slightly arched back. It hails from Gloucestershire, England, where it was once known as the Orchard Pig and was raised on windfall apples. Old Spots are hardy, sweet-natured hogs and outstanding foragers. They produce sweet-tasting, well-marbled, exceptionally flavorful pork, including large hams. This breed is still being raised by the British royal family today.

Our Heritage Hogs

Berkshire

Tamworth

Guinea Hog

Ossabaw

Duroc
Swine breeders in New York and New Jersey developed big, red Duroc hogs during the early 1800s. The breed was widely exported throughout the world and is a major contributor to modern hog operations throughout North America due to its fast maturity and ultra-efficient conversion of feed to meat. The meat from Duroc pigs is typically dark red in color, maintains moisture well and has good fat marbling throughout -- all highly desirable qualities in cuts of pork. Duroc pigs also possess a significant amount of lean muscle and when they are slaughtered the carcasses yield a high amount of usable meat.

Large Black

Red Wattle

Livestock Conservancy Status: Threatened
Heritage Breed

Listed on the Slow Food USA's Ark of Taste.


The Red Wattle’s origin is unclear, but this breed does trace its ancestry to several batches of large, red hogs with wattles that were captured from the wild in areas of East Texas. They’re large hogs, so they require more room to house than smaller heritage breeds. They are, however, fast-maturing, easygoing pigs and hardy, highly efficient foragers. Red Wattle pork is fine-textured, luscious and lean, earning this pig a spot on the Ark of Taste.

quality pet and farm animals 

Tick Briar Farm

Mulefoot:

Livestock Conservancy Status:Critical

Heritage Breed

Listed on the Slow Food USA's Ark of Taste. 


Mulefoot pigs are a domestic pig named after their non-cloven hooves, which are similar to those of a mule. Mulefoots originated when the Spanish introduced swine to the Gulf Coast.  Typically black, Mulefoot pigs flourished during the early part of the 1900s, but by 1985 only one herd remained. There are now fewer than 150 pure bred Mulefoots in existence, making it a critically endangered breed.  However, over the last decade in the United States efforts have been made to conserve the breed. Mulefoot pigs are docile and weigh between 400 and 600 pounds before they reach two years old. They are hardy, docile and outstanding foragers.  Mulefoot hogs are lard pigs, so they fatten easily and produce such succulent, abundantly-marbled, red pork and premium hams that they’re listed on the Ark of Taste.

Berkshire

Berkshire hogs originated in the Berkshire area of England some 200 years ago, where they were fattened on waste products from London’s dairies, breweries and distilleries. The American Berkshire Association, formed in 1875, was the first swine registry established in the world. The Berkshire is a medium to large hog that’s black with a white snout and boots and a splash of white on the tip of its tail. It’s a nicely proportioned pig with small, upright ears and a short, dished face. Berkshires are hardy, fast-maturing, good-natured pigs and famous for their nicely marbled, succulent and flavorful pink meat. They are well known for their juiciness, flavor and tenderness. Their heavy marbled meat is excellent for long and high-temperature cooking. It’s especially popular with Japanese chefs who call it kurobuta (black pig meat).